Rosehip Oil – How this Oil May Help with Psoriasis and Eczema

Abstract

Rosehip oil, or rosehip seed oil, is derived from the Rosa canina rose bush. This herb mainly grows in Chile. (1)

Prized for its healing properties, rosehip oil is extremely rich in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. All of these unique ingredients make rosehip oil very beneficial for the skin. More specifically, this oil helps diseased skin, especially with inflammatory conditions, such as psoriasis and eczema. (2)

Furthermore, rosehip oil can serve as a carrier for essential oils due to its powerful ability to penetrate the deeper layers of the skin. (3)

Rosehip oil may help patients with psoriasis and eczema through:

  • Enhancing the hydration of the skin
  • Restoring skin barrier
  • Lowering inflammation
  • Getting rid of free radicals 
  • Serving as a vessel for transporting vitamins and minerals to the skin

This article will cover the composition of rosehip oil and how it may help patients with psoriasis and eczema.

The composition of rosehip oil

Rosehip oil is extremely rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Examples include linoleic and linolenic acids. These molecules protect all blood vessels, including the ones that nourish your skin. (4)

It also has its fair share of antioxidants, mainly consisting of carotenoids and tocopherols (e.g., vitamin E). (5)

Other components include:

  • Vitamin A and C
  • Phenolic acids (e.g., coumaric acid methyl ester)
  • Vanillin
  • Vanillic acid

Each of these molecules affects the skin differently. Albeit, the final action boils down to dampening inflammation and neutralizing oxidative stress – two processes that comprise the hallmarks of psoriasis and eczema. (6)

Why does combining ingredients produce better results for the skin?

The skin is a complicated organ that has many layers. Each skin layer has unique features that stem from the type of cells it contains. 

These characteristics create unique situations. For instance, a substance can be so effective in laboratory studies on the skin. When applied to humans, it may produce no impact. This is maybe due to the poor penetration of that substance through the skin barrier. 

For these reasons, scientists always looked for molecules with synergetic effects. In other words, there are certain substances that boost the action of other ingredients. (7)

Rosehip oil is the perfect example of synergy. The ingredients found in this oil can boost the action of each other. Examples include the synergy between vitamins A, C, and E. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can actually augment the antioxidative properties of vitamin C. (8)

In summary, it is important to choose ingredients with synergetic properties, especially when dealing with chronic conditions, such as psoriasis and eczema.

How rosehip oil may help psoriasis patients

Dry skin is a huge issue for psoriatic patients. Fortunately, rosehip oil addresses this issue. Due to its rich content in essential fatty acids (e.g., linoleic and linolenic acids), rosehip oil optimizes the skin barrier and prevents water loss. (9)

The fatty acids also serve as a vessel for antioxidants to travel into the deeper layers of the skin.

The moisturizing effect of rosehip oil helps psoriatic patients to hold on to their skin’s natural hydration. In a recent study, researchers found that rosehip oil provides several anti-aging effects, including the ability of the skin to remain moisturized. (10)

Because rosehip oil is a dry, nongreasy oil, most people like to apply it topically.

Another way to help psoriatic patients is by regulating the production of collagen. This protein protects the integrity of the skin barrier and prevents the leakage of water and essential nutrients. The elevated content of vitamin A in rosehip oil makes the production of collagen possible. Furthermore, rosehip oil inhibits the synthesis of an enzyme called MMP-1. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down collagen. (11)

Finally, rosehip oil exerts powerful anti-inflammatory action on the skin. The high levels of polyphenols and anthocyanin regulate the inflammatory cascades, helping you control psoriasis flare-ups. (12)

How rosehip oil help eczema patients

Similar to psoriasis patients, those with eczema have a real issue with skin hydration. As a result, the scaling, itching, and rashes keep getting worse. Moreover, a dehydrated skin is more prone to bacterial and fungal infections. (13)

Applying rosehip oil to areas with eczema can aid with this problem. By repairing the skin barrier, rosehip oil will help you retain your moisture. What’s more, you will no longer lose all those essential oils and nutrients from your skin. (14)

There is some solid evidence that rosehip oil protects the skin from the ultraviolet (UV) light emitted by the sun. This is very important as it indicates the ability of this oil to restore and repair the damaged skin barrier. (15)

Scientists believe that vitamins A and E may be responsible for this effect. Coincidently, these two vitamins have some potent synergetic effect to fight the process of photoaging.

To manage atopic dermatitis with rosehip oil, you need to apply it regularly. However, it is easy to neglect or forget about this oil. This is why you should opt for a simple skincare product (e.g., soap, cream) that contains rosehip oil and other beneficial ingredients. 

This way, you will take the full benefits of rosehip oil, as well as other indispensable molecules.

Conclusion

Rosehip oil seems to carry all the right ingredients that may aid with psoriasis and eczema. The two chronic conditions can benefit from the synergetic effect of the different vitamins, fatty acids, and antioxidants.

We hope that this article managed to highlight the underrated role of rosehip oil in the management of psoriasis and eczema. 

References

1- Gruenwald, J., Uebelhack, R., & Moré, M. I. (2019). Rosa canina – Rose hip pharmacological ingredients and molecular mechanics counteracting osteoarthritis – A systematic review. Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology60, 152958. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2019.152958

2- Roman, I., Stănilă, A., & Stănilă, S. (2013). Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of Rosa canina L. biotypes from spontaneous flora of Transylvania. Chemistry Central journal7(1), 73. https://doi.org/10.1186/1752-153X-7-73

3- Moore, E. M., Wagner, C., & Komarnytsky, S. (2020). The Enigma of Bioactivity and Toxicity of Botanical Oils for Skin Care. Frontiers in pharmacology11, 785. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.00785

4- Kendall, A. C., Kiezel-Tsugunova, M., Brownbridge, L. C., Harwood, J. L., & Nicolaou, A. (2017). Lipid functions in skin: Differential effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cutaneous ceramides, in a human skin organ culture model. Biochimica et biophysica acta. Biomembranes1859(9 Pt B), 1679–1689. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamem.2017.03.016

5- Mármol, I., Sánchez-de-Diego, C., Jiménez-Moreno, N., Ancín-Azpilicueta, C., & Rodríguez-Yoldi, M. J. (2017). Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species. International journal of molecular sciences18(6), 1137. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061137

6- Dobrică, E. C., Cozma, M. A., Găman, M. A., Voiculescu, V. M., & Găman, A. M. (2022). The Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review. Antioxidants (Basel, Switzerland)11(2), 282. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11020282

7- Calzetta, L., & Koziol-White, C. (2021). Pharmacological interactions: Synergism, or not synergism, that is the question. Current research in pharmacology and drug discovery2, 100046. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crphar.2021.100046

8- Traber, M. G., & Stevens, J. F. (2011). Vitamins C and E: beneficial effects from a mechanistic perspective. Free radical biology & medicine51(5), 1000–1013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2011.05.017

9-Lin, T. K., Zhong, L., & Santiago, J. L. (2017). Anti-Inflammatory and Skin Barrier Repair Effects of Topical Application of Some Plant Oils. International journal of molecular sciences19(1), 70. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19010070

10-Phetcharat, L., Wongsuphasawat, K., & Winther, K. (2015). The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity. Clinical interventions in aging10, 1849–1856. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S90092

11-Phetcharat, L., Wongsuphasawat, K., & Winther, K. (2015). The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity. Clinical interventions in aging10, 1849–1856. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S90092

12-Christensen, R., Bartels, E. M., Altman, R. D., Astrup, A., & Bliddal, H. (2008). Does the hip powder of Rosa canina (rosehip) reduce pain in osteoarthritis patients?–a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage16(9), 965-972.

13-Ousey, K., Cutting, K. F., Rogers, A. A., & Rippon, M. G. (2016). The importance of hydration in wound healing: reinvigorating the clinical perspective. Journal of wound care25(3), 122–130. https://doi.org/10.12968/jowc.2016.25.3.122

14-Mármol, I., Sánchez-de-Diego, C., Jiménez-Moreno, N., Ancín-Azpilicueta, C., & Rodríguez-Yoldi, M. J. (2017). Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species. International journal of molecular sciences18(6), 1137. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061137

15-Park, J. E., Kim, H. J., Kim, S. N., Kang, S. H., & Kim, Y. J. (2015). Inhibitory Effect of Rosa multiflora hip Extract on UVB-induced Skin Photoaging in Hs68 Fibroblasts. Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Scientists of Korea41(4), 351-359.

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